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Indian-Americans Called Upon by America Like NEVER BEFORE

There are many things to say about the devastating coronavirus pandemic enveloping the globe. In America we are seeing the worst of humanity (the Kentucky Coronavirus party and thousands of hate crimes against Asian Americans) and also the best (fashion designers sewing masks, Chef Jose Andres feeding the hungry). Here in the United States, we have become the epicenter of the ordeal and the medical system is being strained and tested like never before in our lifetimes. We are in the midst of a bloody war for survival, and the tireless frontline soldiers this time are the doctors, scientists, nurses, and first responders, not machine gunners, grenade throwers, and top gun pilots.

Every one who has called in for duty to battle the virus is a hero. Depending on which source of statistics to believe, physicians of Indian origin make up about 5-10% of all of the active medical doctors in the United States. The meaning of this number is abundantly clear: Indian-Americans are being desperately called upon by their country like never before in our history from sea to sea, in communities large and small. All eyes are watching, and this is our time to shine brighter than ever before as Americans. One can hope that this dangerous, selfless heroism is what we will be remembered for in years to come.

This plays out in different ways. At the macro level we are seeing the ascendance of CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta, giving outstanding medical commentary, author Deepak Chopra expounding on mental health with whatever pseudo-spiritual comfort gibberish the guy comes up with, and Administrator of Medicare and Medicaid Seema Verma standing steel-faced by the president and Anthony Fauci in the federal coronavirus task force briefings- regardless of what you think of her, playing a critical role in the federal response.

At the local level we are seeing tons of media interviews with Indian-American ER doctors and hospital administrators, and categorically they come across as heroic and informative. During b-roll footage we see plenty of brown scientists around the country dripping mysterious liquids into test tubes or plugging away at some medical machine. No doubt some of them will be at the forefront of vaccines and other treatments to be implemented. Indian-Americans are all over the media explaining what coronavirus is, and how to stop its spread.

Despite many pockets of individual greatness, the Indian-American experience has never before had such an awesome collective responsibility or calling. Throughout America’s past wars, Indian-Americans made up minuscule percentages of overall troop strength. That is all changing now in the hard war against the invisible enemy, changing for good.

Godspeed and bravo to all of those on the front line, but forgive me for cheering particularly loudly for the tens of thousands of Indian origin, many whom were made fun of as nerds when they were younger. A large number come from the ranks of family and friends.

Mahanth S. Joishy is Editor of usindiamonitor

VIDEO: Fareed Zakaria Coldly Explains the COVID19 Trump Train Wreck

WATCH THIS NOW

WOMEN SANK the WOMEN WHO RAN FOR US PRESIDENT in 2020

Mahanth S. Joishy is the Editor

via ShareBlue

Like some of you, I am disappointed that there are no women left in the 2020 campaign for President. In a heretofore diverse field that once boasted a strong coterie of women, blacks, an (openly) gay candidate, a white Hindu, a half-Indian, and a Chinese-American, it now just comes down to 3 odd-looking and verbal diarrhea spewing white male septuagenarians: #PervertOrangutan, Joe Biden and Bernie.

Women are largely to blame, which is all the more upsetting. We’ll get to that shortly.

I am willing to expose to you my personal arc in this presidential race in order to establish my deep baseline thoughts about all of this.

As a member of the Mayor Michael Bloomberg administration for 12 great years for both New York City and my local government career, I consider him to be someone who would be an extraordinary president. I also knew on the other hand, he could have no potential path whatsoever to the White House. As I told friends less familiar with his background, Bloomberg is the dictionary-definition of uncharismatic. Stop & Frisk was a disgrace and he had no answer for his policy. Between you and I, I didn’t donate the campaign a dime. 😉 However, if he uses his substantial treasure to help sink the #GrabbingOurPussies party come fall he shall have done us all a huge favor, and I admire him for it. Speaking of treasure- Treasury Secretary might be a good place for Mike to land.

Andrew Yang was from beginning to end my heart in this race. Yang is the only presidential candidate I’ve ever seen in this lifetime who treated his audiences and supporters like adults, discarding the partisan tropes abused by both sides to instead tell voters the harsh truth with liberal use of data and facts, speaking intelligently about them. I love how he forced the Freedom Dividend onto the agenda singlehandedly. I donated to and was loosely part of the Yang Gang. However, I always knew he’d never get more than 5-10% of voters in a nation that is extremely racist and mistrustful of Asian Americans like Yang. I see him as the Commerce Secretary in 2021 (you read it here first).

At first I kicked the tires of the Kamala Harris campaign and wrote about it on these pages. I was on board the Kamala train for a bit, though not very enthusiastically. As her campaign rolled on it became apparent her management team was painfully incompetent.

Bye, Felicia. via newyorker.com

I love Hawaii. I deeply appreciate every American combat war veteran. I love the ocean, and surfing. I am a Hindu. I visited a beautiful Hindu temple in Kauai, which Tulsi has attended. One would think that Tulsi Gabbard would resonate with me for these reasons. I truly wanted to like her campaign. However, I loathe this wolf in sheep’s clothing and her campaign. Drop out already, you Republican plant!

Joe Biden has become incapable of stringing a grammatically correct sentence together, which has shaken my confidence in him since his glory days as Obama’s sidekick. Bernie Sanders says things I agree with, but has no chance of getting any of it done. He couldn’t get free health care or college done in tiny, liberal, homogeneous Vermont, so we are supposed to believe he’ll turn all of America into Denmark?

I kicked a lot of tires on a lot of candidates, and spent a lot of time doing it. I’m a political junky to the core, but for most of 2019 one struggling to find a camp to join while the various tribes slaughtered each other gratuitously. So in early Fall 2019, I finally threw my weight behind Elizabeth Warren. She had it all, in my estimation. Highly intelligent, accomplished, relatable. A former special education teacher- which would help her deal with the #PervertOrangutan. She could take Bernie’s plans and actually execute some of those worthy goals. She is a lecture-prone professor, sure, but one you could also play beer pong with after class. People made fun of her for having exquisitely detailed plans. I ask in all seriousness, what is wrong with those people?

No matter. The Elizabeth Warren star rose and fell before 2020 for no discernible reason to me. Except that she is a woman, and the concurrent fears that a woman is unelectable in the general election. This is entirely unfair. And it’s largely the fault of women, because the data shows that far more women have voted in Democratic primaries than men. But they didn’t poll or vote for Klobuchar, Warren, Harris, Gabbard, or Gillibrand. They picked men, like so many female #PervertOrangutan voters often following the lead of their husbands and boyfriends straight into the Gates of Hell. As bad, the female candidates never tried to unite or back one another with, say, endorsements when they dropped out.

Of course I’m going to #VoteBlueNoMatterWho, but now we have to sit back for the next few months and watch as Bernie and Biden claw at each other in a Grumpy Old Men Death match- which already promises to be a bloody civil war. The other side is licking its chops in the meanwhile. Thanks, ladies.

EDITORIAL: So Do We Board the Kamala Harris Train?

I DON’T KNOW! via nbcnews.com

Before 2019 the only serious US presidential hopefuls of Indian ancestry in history were unimpressive politicians whose main purpose in life was to hope and pray that you forget that they are even Indian-Americans: Bobby Jindal and Nikki Haley. You can read my fascinating opinions about these drawlin’ Dixieland Republicans Bobby here and Nikki here. Those brown folk failed pretty miserably and unceremoniously on the national stage and deservedly so.

Along comes California Senator Kamala Harris, the next viable candidate for President of the United States. Half-Indian and half-black- a cocktail I like to call “Blindian”- Kamala is largely considered by the mainstream media to be black, like Barack Obama, despite an Indian mom who carried her in the womb for 9 months and seems to have instilled many values in her daughter. Kamala has decided to join the oppressively crowded 2020 race, which promises to feature the most Democratic primary candidates in history.  No clear frontrunner has emerged so far, and numerous others expect to throw their hats into the already crowded ring soon.

via TIME magazine

She certainly isn’t the only minority in the field- we have heard announcements from Joaquin Castro and Corey Booker. Kamala isn’t the only woman either, as Elizabeth Warren, Kirsten Gillibrand and more are in the game. She also isn’t the best known, or the most liberal- Bernie and Elizabeth got her beat on both those counts. She’s youngish, but not the youngest or most youthful. Like many Democrats, usindiamonitor is struggling to decide who to root for this time around- an unprecedented personal phenomenon. I’ve ALWAYS known who I wanted to win in any given presidential race since 1988. Perhaps one factor matters more than any other in 2020 for me and millions of other voters: can the candidate knock Trump far, far out of the White House if he’s still eating cheeseburgers and tweeting in it? We just may need to wait until the debates begin to suss out the question of electability- and hope the left coalesces in unity around the brawler who emerges from the primary alive.

It’s very early, but Kamala just may be that person who survives the gauntlet. I am not firmly on the Kamala Harris Express, but I’m hanging onto the side out the door, like so many commuter train passengers in India. That’s more than I can say for any other candidate. Here’s why.

via ibtimes.co.in

Electability. At this time it’s a most dangerous game to guess at how voters will act in 2020. In fact, I often lament the sheer length of presidential campaigns that waste our time, money, and attention for over 2 years each cycle- a truly barbarian practice for both candidates and citizenry, when just 3 months would suffice as in most civilized nations. But Americans live (and die) for the horse race, hardly caring to learn about which candidate favors what policies. Many a meal ticket are stamped over these months too in the nests of political operatives, pollsters, journalists like yours truly, hookers, and event managers to name a few. To this atmosphere of Idiocracy reality, Kamala brings a strong combination of intelligence, calm demeanor, attractiveness, elocution skills, optimism, energy, and charisma to excite voters. We have already established she isn’t the candidate who stands out for her race, youth, leftist credentials, name recognition, or gender. She isn’t the frontrunner for big money donors or establishment Democrat support. She isn’t the Senator who has been on the forefront or spotlight in the vanguards of battle. I also believe that she truly fumbled during the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, inflicting no lasting damage on the drunken brute. But if you line her up on each criteria and add up the scores, she would do rather well indeed.

Policy.  The first Indian-American Senator in US history grew up in the prosecutorial ranks, eventually climbing up to the role of San Francisco Attorney General and California Attorney General. It’s appropriate that the liberal bastion state and HQ of the Resistance produced Kamala Harris.

The chief criticisms of her record on the left come from her tough reputation for putting criminals away for long periods of time- or “jamming them up” in prosecutors’ parlance. As per the Kamala Harris official website:

Over the course of her nearly two terms in office, Kamala won a $25-billion settlement for California homeowners hit by the foreclosure crisis, defended California’s landmark climate change law, protected the Affordable Care Act, helped win marriage equality for all Californians, and prosecuted transnational gangs that trafficked in guns, drugs, and human beings.

We can add voting rights, childcare expansion, and raising wages to the progressive list of her priorities. As far as bona fides go, that’s pretty good. She is strong on climate change, the existential threat of our time, and healthcare expansion. We have yet to see how well this will all play beyond California though.

Personal History. Like Obama in the 2008 election cycle, Harris is a first-term Senator with a thin record. This has its advantages and disadvantages. A light Senate resume makes it harder for opponents to pin her down and label her for positions taken, while policy wonks like Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown will rightly point to the national battles they have fought that Kamala hasn’t. Kamala doesn’t have as many scars, for better or worse.

Meanwhile, we will find out if Kamala’s status as a married woman will help her or even matter in the modern age. Corey Booker’s distinction as an unmarried bachelor would certainly have damaged his candidacy in any race up till 2016 under endless discussions of “family values,” whatever that means. Not having a spouse or kids should not disqualify a candidate, but voters seem to connect better with those who have an active family life that they can flaunt in magazine features.

In conclusion, the field is crowded and growing. Usindiamonitor does not claim unbridled excitement about any of the candidates yet. But if the election were held today, I’d pull the lever for Kamala Harris. She would make for a good president- measured, calm, capable, and progressive. Kamala represents the future, while many candidates are dug deep in their past. She’ll certainly be better than the current occupier of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and just maybe the campaign will prove her to be the best of the 2020 parade.

Mahanth S. Joishy is Editor of usindiamonitor

Violated in the Temple: A Victim Speaks Out

 

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Editor’s Note: The following is a real firsthand account of unfortunate events involving someone I know, which happened in summer 2018.  I have watched her grow up since she was born, and this story has filled me with anger.  Even worse, she was not the only one.  But her response deserves attention.  She has courageously fought back against the holy priest and the management of the otherwise outwardly beautiful Mangueshi Hindu temple pictured above, visited by no less than former US Defense Secretary Ash Carter himself (!)

The story has received national media attention in India (links below).  

It is high time that India sees the rise of its own powerful #MeToo movement and we are beginning to see the saplings grow as victims bravely engage the patriarchal and supposedly religious systems stacked against them.  Ultimately, there is an uplifting future embodied below, if others are inspired to act.  

***

A monumental victory was achieved yesterday, all thanks to my family for fighting tirelessly over the last month for my rights, a lot of strangers for their support, the media all over India who shone light on this issue, and the Indian legal system for ensuring that justice was served against a perpetrator who wronged me. I’m not one for sharing intimate life details with everyone on Facebook, but by my sharing this experience, I hope that others can avoid the same situation.

This past June when I was in India, my family and I made a day-trip by flight to Goa to visit our ancestral temple, as we have been doing at least once a year for as long as I can remember. Single women are not allowed in the innermost sanctum, so I have always sat and watched my parents and brother perform the rites inside. On this particular trip as I was sitting outside the sanctum, our family priest in his 50s, Dhananjay Bhave, beckoned me to the side, grabbed me, and attempted to kiss me. I turned my cheek and body away just in time to avoid him. I told my parents what had happened, and they confronted the priest who then admitted it and requested us not to escalate the matter.

Finding this to be completely repulsive and unacceptable, and yet wanting to preserve the reputation of our family temple, I sent a formal complaint to the management committee of the temple charging Bhave for his behavior, demanding he be fired, and pointing to the CCTV security footage from that area of the temple as evidence. THREE WEEKS later the committee responded saying they would not be taking any action and we were free to take up this case with the ‘relevant authorities’. During this time, we found out by chance that another 20-year old girl from Mumbai had filed a complaint against the same priest for a nearly identical incident 8 days prior to my visit, and had received the same noncommittal response from the temple management. The day after we received their response from the management, my mom filed a police report/ FIR on my behalf with the Goa Police, and a few days later the other girl also lodged another FIR.

Around this same time, the formal complaints which the both of us had written to the temple management went viral on WhatsApp to everyone in the community, and news sources picked it up. Overnight every regional news source in Goa and every national paper all over India was carrying the story. 10 days ago the matter went to court for the first time for Bhave’s bail, where his defense argued that me and the other girl must be conspiring together for publicity and to tarnish the reputation of the temple, and we had mistaken his gentlemanly affectionate behavior for something more sinister. Our public prosecutor argued that me and the other girl had never met (and have still never met) and could have no ulterior motives, and Bhave was already a HABITUAL offender and would possibly target many other girls while out on bail. Yesterday, the judge in Goa gave her verdict of DENYING Bhave’s bail. As of now, Bhave is ABSCONDING from arrest and is yet to go to jail where he now legally belongs. I don’t know where this case will go in the years to come, but for now this court ruling is a big victory for everyone who has been fighting for me and the other girl, and for all the girls who have undoubtedly faced similar experiences at his hands in silence, and the many more who would have suffered in the future if not for this ongoing case.

A few points that I want share about this entire experience for other girls who hopefully won’t, but one day may find themselves in a position similar to mine:

1. A lot of people asked why I didn’t yell or even hit him right when it happened. Or why my family didn’t file a police report in Goa the same day. In the moment, I reacted with shock because I have been raised to have utmost respect for the temple and our priests, and not question many practices associated with them. I was genuinely shocked about what was happening given that this is someone I have seen once a year while growing up. I needed time to process the incident, and my family needed time to decide on the best course of action. In hindsight while I could have reacted differently, I also believe that the actions that have taken place in the last month will have a more permanent impact on the running of the temple and putting a stop to such behavior.

2. “Is this honestly really even a big deal? These things happen all time. Why don’t you just forget about it and move on, that’ll be much easier.” This is actually what makes me the saddest, and is something I’ve heard mostly from women. The bottom line is that nobody can touch me ANYWHERE without my permission. Yes, it would have been easier for me to forget about this incident and move on, but the complacency we’ve come to have as women from facing these sorts of incidents regularly from passersby on commutes etc. is truly depressing. As a result, many women have become desensitized to being taken advantage of, and because most of the time no action is taken at all, repeat offenders continue to get away with it. In this case, Bhave’s perverted behavior stops with me, and I hope in due time, that we develop a no-tolerance policy to such behavior.

3. I have been very fortunate with a lot of factors in my favor: the good judgement to recognize that what was happening that day was in every way wrong, the education and support to take steps to stand up for myself, and that my family has taken this forward. I recognize that not everyone who experiences these things has these resources, but I HIGHLY encourage everyone to at least tell someone they trust. Information is power, and it is only because the secretary of the temple confused our two cases and accidentally told us about the other girl’s complaint that we were able to connect with her family and our case became twice as strong with our joint police reports. It was also by reading the Facebook post of another acquaintance a few years ago, that I remembered that perpetrators are discouraged from doing such acts not by harsh punishments, but by the fear of being caught. It is imperative to trust your gut about how a situation is going and call out such behavior.

4. “It’s a pure reformist attitude and these girls have links to America, and are broad-minded. They are not village girls. This is the new generation of girls” — If you can believe it, this was part of Bhave’s defense attorney’s statement AGAINST me in court. I never imagined these words would be used in a negative connotation, because honestly they sound like the biggest compliment anyone could have paid me. However, what he was implying was that we were too educated and too bold for our own good. Little did he expect that these are the very factors that have now determined that his client belongs in jail.

5. This point should not even bear mentioning, but since it has become a point of debate: A lot of people have questioned what I was wearing that day. Just to clarify, whether it was a prom dress or a saree, Hindu priests never, ever touch any part of a woman’s body. As it happens, the priest’s traditional dress is a simple silk cloth around his waist, and I was wearing a traditional salwar kameez and was covered from head to toe as I am when I visit any holy place, but as I said this detail is totally irrelevant to the case. On a similar note, many (including Bhave’s defense) questioned the caste of the other girl and whether she should have been allowed into the temple in the first place. I can’t even bear to get into how it doesn’t change the actions that the managing committee should have taken when they first received our formal complaints.

6. Lastly, although I took the first step of writing a formal complaint to the temple committee, every step taken in this process since then has been by my parents, my dad’s brothers, and the rest of my extended family in India who have been working round-the-clock to ensure justice. I have been back at med school for the last 3 weeks, and if it wasn’t for their indignation on my behalf and unconditional love, I would probably have given up a long time ago. Countless others have been instrumental in working towards this. Also, in every article about this incident, I have been referred to as a “victim” or the “U.S. based medical student”. Part of the reason I am sharing this whole experience is because I refuse to be the anonymous victim to someone else’s wrong doing. Instead, I will claim ownership over this incident, have ensured that the guilty party has been shamed and punished, and then move on with my own life.

Once again, I am writing this to raise awareness that unfortunately incidents like these are commonplace, even when you least expect it and from people you least expect it. Some people have reacted to my story with disbelief because the perpetrator was a holy priest in the most famous temple in Goa. Many people also expressed doubt that this case would go anywhere because of the power and money behind the temple (ironically donated by many families like ours over many decades). Unfortunately evil can lurk anywhere, but regardless of who it is, you ALWAYS have a voice, options and the rights to never let anyone take advantage of you.

 

Sexual assaults in Goa temple: ‘Charges stem from reformist attitude, aim to gain publicity’

Two Mumbai women accuse Goa Mangueshi Temple priest of kissing them

https://www.ndtv.com/…/medical-student-accuses-goa-temple-p…

https://indianexpress.com/…/goa-mangueshi-temple-us-studen…/

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/…/articles…/65275344.cms

photo credit: alchetron

 

Donald Trump is a Tool. Use It to Your Advantage Like I Did.

All of my life, I had heard about the concept of depression from other people, but it always appeared to me as a foreign object that I would struggle to understand.  People I know over the years would talk about their depressions or nervous breakdowns, or those of their own family members and friends.  But I would be on the outside looking in, like watching it snow inside a snow globe but not understanding what it would be like to get 5 feet of snow dumped on top of my head and stay buried under it.

All that would change.  November 8, 2016 started out great enough.  As a New York City civil servant, I got election day off that day, just like I had every year.  I woke up on that nice fall day in Brooklyn and went to vote at a school in my awesome neighborhood called Cobble Hill.  There was a beautiful five year old girl waiting in line with her mother, and on my way out she asked her mom if she could get an “I voted today” sticker that she saw on people’s shirts.  Just as her mom told her it had to be earned by adults who voted, I gave the little girl my own.  I felt great and so did the little girl.

It was a happy moment for me, and the first of many on the day.  I hung out for the rest of the day off with my good friends in the hipster enclave of Red Hook, joking, laughing, eating, drinking, walking, talking, flirting with strangers, and trying to soak in the fact that within a few hours, America would finally vote in its first female president in history.

By 11pm that night, I went into a state of physical and mental shock.  I exchanged a set of WhatsApp messages with my close relative, who was sitting on a beach in India and drinking beers early in the morning, India time, seeing the same live US election results that I was.  Indeed, he had predicted Trump’s victory months earlier, but I refused to entertain even a hint of that thought.  “Are you doing okay?” he asked.  For the first time in my life, after quick consideration I responded to him with the honesty that a close relative and friend deserved: “No,” I replied.

***

It sounds cheesy to say this when so many people have worse problems than me, like painful stages of cancer, dead children, blindness, or missing legs.  Plus I am by no means alone in falling into a dark abyss late in 2016.  But I had to admit to myself that my world had shattered.  Many others probably felt as bad or worse, for example those who worked on Hillary’s election campaign and were cheated out of victory.

But I can only speak for myself.  I finally learned what depression meant, the hard way, as I mourned the end of America as we knew it.  It was like a family member I loved dying.  My optimism, which always drove me for 36 years of life was melting away in real time.   I went from an optimist to a cynic.  And being unused to cynicism, I found out for the first time that it’s a very hard way to live.

I have always had jobs since my 16th birthday, and I always worked hard.  But on November 9th, 2016, I could not do a single shred of work properly.  I sat and largely stared at my computer screen.  My body felt frozen.  My mind was numb.  I couldn’t focus for more than three minutes at a time.  I was surrounded by colleagues who were going through the same thing, and on this particular day, it was considered acceptable and almost predictable to be useless and unproductive.  After all, most of us lived and worked together in New York City.  We knew the criminal scumbag con man Trump better than anyone else did.  It wasn’t us who voted that charlatan and his evil family in, it was the rest of the country’s fault.  Not that it made us New Yorkers feel any better.

The next few months were painful as I descended into feeling hopeless and helpless about the world, and wondering what the point of it all was if we were headed toward destroying humanity and our planet anyway at some point soon.  Family members and friends were feeling many of the same cynical things and didn’t offer a way out.  I burned.  I started giving up on trying to be healthy, or caring about current events, or the future.  Classic depression type symptoms.  And I was smart enough to know it.

But then something happened.  By February 2017 we began seeing the flickering glimmer of a path towards takedown and impeachment, which I am now confident is inevitable.  I went through a few dark and deep spiritual experiences in this period of time.  My optimism gradually and slowly re-emerged, like a glorious Phoenix from the ashes of the very fire that had burned me.

I got serious about writing fiction, something I had been talking and thinking about since I was 12 years old.  I entered a fiction contest on a whim and got second place.   I became active on Twitter, starting arguments and rants and making jokes, and it all felt therapeutic during a hard time.  I started donating to political campaigns, and signing petitions.  I regained some of the joy and fun in dating, which had been absent for several years since my divorce, a period when I viewed dating as a chore and a bore.  I initiated a serious job search process, which resulted in me moving out of New York City to Wisconsin to take on a new job, career trajectory, and life in an extremely different place.  I began playing the tablas again after a 20 year hiatus.  I began playing the drum set again after a 20 year hiatus.  And between 2017 and early 2018, I finally completed a first draft of my novel manuscript.

If I were to blame Trump for feeling depressed, it would only be fair to assign my nearly pathological quest to improve myself in isolation on an island while the world was falling apart all around me, to his specter too.  I was forcibly stuffed into a dark place by a monster.  I feel that I have clawed my way out of the hole.  Shouldn’t the monster get at least some of the credit too?

I believe so.  And I also think that other people, and the national conscience as a collective may be able to do the same, and use the sorrow and hate and rage and depression to their advantage, and our advantage.  Donald Trump, his supporters, and all of the evil that they represent can be viewed as a giant stress test– on you, on me, on the country, and on the world.  Assuming we survive the stress test, we will be better off.  That which does not kill you will make you stronger.

I feel like I am living proof of that.  Now, when the idiot tweets something, threatens somebody, lies about something, bombs somewhere, or goes golfing while the world burns, I don’t give a shit like I used to.  I ignore it.  He is too dumb to be worth my time. SCREW HIM.  It’s up to the creaky system now.  Let the old white Republican men like Comey, Mueller, Rosenstein, Flake, Corker, and McCain take out their own trash.

I’m going to be over here, working on becoming a constantly new and improving version of myself.  Thank you.  I mean that sincerely for helping me become a better man.  I am using you like the tool that you are.

-Mahanth S. Joishy

 

 

Meet the Biggest Indian-American Traitor in US History

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Indian-Americans tend to be loyal to the United States.  They generally work or study, raise their families, and peacefully go about their business as doctors or cab drivers or hotel owners.  Some sign up to be in government (like me) or the military.  They tend to be liberal, but they do float across the political spectrum.  They win almost every spelling bee.

Rarely will you find an Indian-American shooting up a school, joining a gang, starting a supremacist militia, or getting recruited by ISIS or Al-Qaeda.  While these things might occur, they happen at far lower rates than with other diasporas.  Most people credit education and family structure for these things, like with other successful communities.

Therefore, when someone from our diaspora commits active treason against the United States, it becomes sort of a big deal because such cases are so few and far between.  Dig and scrape through the archives back to 1776, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find what’s right in front of our faces today.  I present to you Exhibit A, the deplorable White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary, Raj Shah, a traitor not just to Indian-Americans like Bobby Jindal is, but to the United States itself.

Unsurprisingly for a Trump appointee, Raj is reckless.  His DWI conviction for a booze-soaked BMW ride in New Mexico got him fired from a political job in 2010.  Want to bet that the time he got caught was the only time Raj went a-boozin’ and a-drivin’? Perfect fit in this administration full of boozers, wife-beaters, racists, traitors, misogynists, money launderers, gangsters, and perverts, right?

Now we don’t use the word *traitor* lightly, and not all of those cursed souls in the White House deserve that label.  Only the ones outright lying to cover up crimes against the United States, like Shah’s disgusting boss, Sarah Huckaberry Colonel Sanders whom the guy must have learned so much from.   He has been fortunate to learn from the very worst.  On February 8th, Shah gave her the day off and fumbled through a press conference about the administration’s extremely poor handling of wife-beater Rob Porter’s employment, and worse, personally defended Porter himself repeatedly.  Shah embarrassed all Indians around the world that day.  On top of it all, he was an overmatched, unprepared blathering idiot on the podium: he was not even good at being a bad human being.

But the treason against the United States has taken place in relation to Russia.  Shah is knee deep in the #TrumpRussia scandal, defending his boss’s illegal activities time and again, hyping up the obstructive Devin Nunes memo, casting aspersions on the Steele dossier, and repeating wing nut nonsense about FISA warrants, all of which smells very much like obstruction of justice.

Congratulations, Raj.  You are the biggest Indian-American traitor in US history.  I hope you go down hard along with your false idols Colonel Huckaberry and Captain Bonespur.

Mahanth S. Joishy is Editor of usindiamonitor

PS: Nikki Haley today saved herself from joining the Indian-American treason this week by squarely blaming Russia for the chemical terrorism in the UK.  Raj, it’s not too late to get on the right side of history.

These guys are REAL Cleveland Indians Celebrating the NBA Finals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you call these two guys Cleveland Indians, or Cleveland Browns, this may just be the best fan photo to come out of the NBA finals this year.  I challenge you to find a better one.  For those of you who aren’t NBA fans, this is of course, about Steph Curry.  Good luck Cavs.   #DefendtheLand

Indian-American Comedian Hasan Minhaj Cracks Up the White House Correspondents’ Dinner

Mahanth S. Joishy is Editor of usindiamonitor

It seems that Indian comedians are ascendant these days.

We saw that the first SNL monologue in the Trump Era was performed by Aziz Ansari, who hit a deep home run during a time of great anxiety for many around the world.  His fellow Muslim Indian-American comedian, Hasan Minhaj, was on the mic at the 2017 White House Correspondents’ Dinner, which did not include President Trump, who is a poor sport utterly lacking a sense of humor.  Trump has no self-awareness and doesn’t want to admit it, but his bumbling around the corners of our federal government is pretty easy to make fun of.

For those of us who didn’t know much about the young and talented Minhaj, this is a good introduction.  Minhaj carries the event well, despite some awkward half-hearted applauses.  The writing and delivery are spot on in a pressure packed environment featuring top journalists, politicians, and celebrities.  In this era of American darkness, we need more brown men to step up and poke fun at our leader- and our crumbling media landscape.   They are two cracking pillars of an American society in rapid decline, right before our very eyes.

Sean Spicer Threatens Indian-American: “Such a Great Country that Allows You to be Here.”

This video says a lot.  Watch it.  Whether or not you agree with the line or tone of questioning, it’s quite telling that Sean Spicer opines on whether Indian-Americans are “allowed” in this country in response.

In the words of Sree Chauhan, a US-born education advocate in Washington D.C. who took this video of Spicer at an Apple store:

“I was not polite. But when does being impolite mean that I should be thrown out of the United States of America? The country I was born in, the country I was raised in, the country I love despite its flaws.

I have spent enough time online to encounter rabid Trump supporters. Many of these folks see my brown skin and question my citizenship. They question whether I am here legally. They tell me to leave the country. They have told me to go back to where I came from. To which my snarky reply is often, “Go back where? New York?”

“Such a great country that allows you to be here.”

It’s one thing to have a Twitter egg tell say you do not belong in America, it is quite another to have the Press Secretary of the United States of America do so. I am still astounded. And while I am fearless, I wonder how this administration will use its power to silence ordinary people like me.”

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