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Let’s Finally Bring Home the WWII Arunachal MIA War Dead

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Many American soldiers served and died in the various bloody theaters of World War II.  They were called upon by the people of America and the wider family of civilized nations around the world to defeat burgeoning, horrific threats to the global order.  They enjoined what history has widely judged to be a just and necessary war.  Hundreds of thousands of these heroes’ remains were duly brought back home to be buried by their families and friends in somber funeral ceremonies across the 50 states.  While those war dead represented the greatest possible sacrifice to country at a critical moment in history, and also a tragic loss for countless communities, at least upon paying the terrible price they received the proper honor they deserved in a final resting place chosen by those who loved them the most after earning victory. In the 1940s and beyond their headstones would be adorned with inspiring inscriptions, soaring monuments, and beautiful flowers, or they could lie next to their brothers in arms in dignified venues such as Arlington Cemetery, their heroism to be cherished by the generations to come and most importantly, never, ever forgotten.

Yet the remains of too many of these brave souls unceremoniously languish even today under remote corners of Indian stone and soil, in the incongruously scenic mountains and fields of Arunachal Pradesh, a Northeastern state riven by contentious territorial disputes between the rising superpowers, China and India.

They were US Airmen whose planes crashed in the heat of battle, and the Great War is still not over for them at all.  We have a good idea of exactly who they are and where they lie, but the descendants and friends of approximately 400 men have been innocent victims squarely caught in the crossfire of endless bureaucratic disputes between nations- *nations whose soldiers fought alongside them as allies in WW II, no less.*  Government bureaucracies are preventing even basic access to the sites where these men lie, forever young.  Meanwhile, challenging and complex as the solutions may be, the United States government has not fought hard enough for a clean resolution, which should disturb all Americans who still benefit from the fruits of the MIA soldiers’ ultimate sacrifice.

As an Indian-American in particular, I feel the pain and helplessness suffered by the wives, siblings, and children who are living and over time, dying without the simple satisfaction of closure that society owes them.

What will it take to right this injustice?  Previous editorials in this space by Gary Zaetz, the leader of Families and Supporters of America’s Arunachal Missing in Action paint a  picture of tireless efforts, promising breakthroughs, productive archaeological surveys and digging expeditions, and minor victories on the rare occasion where a limited expedition turns up a small fraction of a soldier’s strewn body parts over 70 years after World War II ended.

The Pentagon has even sponsored a few ceremonies for a few of them.  Many journalists, government leaders, and concerned citizens around the world have encouragingly offered support for the cause.  But what sticks out most cruelly are the reams of red tape thrown forward by the halls of power in Washington, New Delhi, and Beijing which are stifling progress.  Please read these moving editorials by Gary Zaetz here with critical updates to the story published here and here.  Please take a few moments to scan the photos of the pilots and crew members, and look straight into the eyes of these young men and their families.

So what are the main challenges today?  The key roadblock is the fact that China and India disagree about who the land belongs to, along with thousands of other miles of far-flung border lands throughout the Himalayan Mountain region.  The two nations themselves have fought major wars in the 20th century over various little pieces of this turf in tragic pissing matches, with China defeating India badly, along with numerous smaller skirmishes that continue to this day.  None of these have served to permanently settle the disputes over territory between these two nuclear weapon-tipped rivals.  Hundreds of thousands of troops from both sides uneasily patrol the disputed regions in an ugly stalemate.  The United Nations and the international community have been helpless in helping settle the disputes.  Under the current postures of the involved nations, China will not allow peaceful expeditions to search for the remains safely behind a security cordon.  India, viewing its role in the matter as subservient to wider engagement priorities in dialogue with China, has been unwilling to support the expeditions despite claiming outright that the territory is Indian.  Perhaps understandably under the harsh realities, neither China nor India have decided to lead the discovery of American bodies.  More vexingly, successive United States governments under administration after administration both Democrat and Republican have not taken full accountability for their own war dead either.

This should not stand.  In fact, there is a duly appointed Pentagon office called Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) whose entire mission and reason for being is to find, recover, and repatriate the US military’s MIAs around the world.  Unlike MIAs in Vietnam and elsewhere, where it may seem like finding them is sort of a “cold case,” there is more accurate information as to where to look in the case of Arunachal’s MIA soldiers.  However, since 2004 communications and efforts of the Families and Supporters for Arunachal’s Missing in Action with the DPAA has resulted in limited progress.

The group has also earnestly reached out to US Senators, Representatives, State Department officials such as multiple US Ambassadors to India over time, senior Indian government officials such as retired Indian military officers, the Chinese Embassy in Washington, media groups, and others.  Unfortunately, these communications have largely resulted in finger pointing about who is responsible for the lack of accountability in leading the long-overdue MIA discoveries.  Over the last several years I have felt increasingly hapless due to the sea of red tape that has risen up.

We can certainly do better!  I have contemplated what simple actions can be taken by concerned readers, regardless of where you live in the world, your politics, culture, or your religious background in the face of what seem like insurmountable challenges as large as the Himalaya mountains themselves.  After all, this is purely a humanitarian issue with a potential solution in sight, a light at the end of the tunnel.  You can join in by doing the following:

1)   Join the Facebook page for the latest updates and offer your support in any way you can to this nonprofit organization, including financial.

2)   Reach out with targeted messaging to the relevant government authorities individually, or as part of an organization you belong to such as local VFW or American Legion posts.  Feel free to use the content from this editorial or others we have shared here as a guide, such as copying and pasting into emails, letters, or social media:

* DPAA http://www.dpaa.mil/Contact/Contact-Us/

* The US Embassy to India https://in.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/new-delhi/

* The Indian Embassy to the United States https://www.indianembassy.org/

* The White House https://www.whitehouse.gov/

* Your Senator and Congressperson

3)  Publish these letters and emails in local newspapers, newsletters, or social media outlets that you have access to.

4)  If you can, set up meetings with government leaders who may have the power to assist in finding and bringing home the MIAs of Arunachal Pradesh.

5)  Communicate any fresh ideas you might have to usindiamonitor or to Gary Zaetz, as you may think of new angles not yet considered for achieving elusive progress.

If enough people join this fight, the Arunachal Pradesh expeditions can continue apace once again with the approvals of all the relevant authorities- a long and hard slog in its own right so far led by a team including Clayton Kuhles, despite the government resistance.  Indian-Americans, other NRIs, or Indians residing in India itself can join with this cause in solidarity.  But of course, all comers would be most welcome.

The saddest aspect is that the loved ones of the US war dead will themselves be buried without the satisfaction of burying their own hero family members.  This suffering is unnecessary and unacceptable, if there is something that can be done about it.

To some I understand that this may all appear to be such a small and unimportant priority from a long bygone era, when there are so many active problems going on in the world of today.  To those, I would respond that if we patriots can’t take care of these little things as a society, then how can we possibly hope to tackle the grand global challenges society faces today?

I look forward to hearing from you on this conundrum.

Mahanth S. Joishy is Editor of usindiamonitor
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Families of World War II Arunachal MIA Soldiers STILL WAITING FOR JUSTICE

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For most American families, “India” evokes such positive images as India’s wonderful cuisines, its many cultural treasures such as the Taj Mahal and the great Hindu books, Gandhi’s historic civil disobedience campaign against British rule, the epic accomplishments of Indian scientists, and the physical and spiritual benefits of the discipline of yoga.  Unfortunately, for a small group of American families, numbering in the hundreds, India does not evoke such positive thoughts.  They are the families of US servicemen killed in India during World War Two – servicemen whose remains still lie unburied there because of the Indian Government’s long history of callousness toward their humanitarian plight.  For these families, who only want the Indian Government to honor their right to repatriate their loved ones’ remains for proper burial, “India” only evokes thoughts of frustration and resentment.

A fundamental aspect of basic human decency, shared by all religions and all cultures worldwide throughout history, is that families have not only a right but an obligation to honor the mortal remains of their deceased loved ones ceremonially with a funeral ceremony as soon as possible after they die.  If families are refused access to the mortal remains of their loved ones, they are illegitimately deprived of the ability to exercise this right and obligation, and those who refuse this access deserve the severest condemnation.   This right is well-established in both the Geneva Conventions and the body of customary international humanitarian law.

.An estimated 400 US servicemen still lie unrecovered at or near a multitude of  World War II crash sites in northeast India.   Since the turn of the millenium, 15 of these crash sites have been located, photographed, and documented by the American MIA investigator Clayton Kuhles.   From the late 1970s until late 2008, and then from 2010 to 2015, the Government of India did not permit US Defense Department recovery teams into the region of India – Arunachal Pradesh – where most of the remains of US airmen in India lie unburied.    For a brief time only (late 2008 until late 2009), the Government of India permitted only one of the many well-known crash sites in Arunachal Pradesh to be investigated for remains, a crash site located on a mountainside in the Upper Siang district near the village of Damroh.  In late 2009 the UPA Government withdrew that permission, without a word of protest by the Obama Administration, before any human remains could be recovered.  From early 2010 until the assumption of the Modi Government, a de facto moratorium was imposed on Arunachal recoveries.  Even after the Modi Government took over, the de facto moratorium continued for well over a year, until the Modi Government, faced with bad publicity over this situation in the Indian press, finally relented and permitted some token recovery efforts.

.During the years (2010-2015) the Indian Government imposed a de facto moratorium on remains recoveries in Arunachal Pradesh, many close relatives of these airmen died, forever deprived by the Indian Government of their right, recognized by the Geneva Conventions (to which India is a signatory). to reunite with the remains of their loved ones killed in wartime, and give them the honored funerals they deserve. Faced with this violation of such a foundational principle of humanitarianism, I (a nephew of one of these MIA servicemen) founded Families and Supporters of America’s Arunachal Missing in Action  to lobby the Government of India to honor its obligation to allow the recovery of the bodies of these men from its sovereign territory, an obligation frequently supported by statements of Indian leaders, but almost never honored by action.

Secondarily, our efforts have focused on trying to get our own Government – the US Government – to pressure the Government of India to honor these obligations. The Obama Administration was more concerned with selling to arms to India, conducting joint military exercises, and concluding lucrative commercial contracts with Indian companies than with recovering our war dead. The Obama Administration even went so far as to make patently transparent excuses for the Indian Government’s inaction.

With the transition to the Trump Administration, it’s anybody’s guess whether President Trump will make recovery of our MIAs in India a higher priority.   Disturbingly, when US Secretary of Defense Mattis recently talked with Indian Defence Minister Parrikar, published accounts of the conversation made no mention of US MIAs in India.

Those who counsel patience to the families of these men are tragically unrealistic. Many of these MIAs still have elderly brothers and sisters who deserve to have their right to bury their loved ones honored during their own lifetimes.   These relatives do not have many years left themselves – patience is the one thing they cannot afford. They deserve to have the remains of their relatives repatriated NOW.

Regards,

Gary Zaetz

Founder/Chairman of Families and Supporters of America’s Arunachal Missing in Action

Cary, North Carolina

*GUEST EDITORIAL* Time to Bring Home America’s Arunachal Missing in Action

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Editor’s Note:  usindiamonitor only very recently came across this purely humanitarian issue of bringing home the remains of MIA American pilots who crashed in India.  While the views here are those of the author and Families and Supporters of America’s Arunachal Missing in Action, we stand strongly in support of this cause and encourage action by every reader regardless of where you are.  Obama’s pending visit to India brings fanfare-focused media attention but this is a real issue that deserves more exposure.  These Americans who fought alongside the Chinese cannot be recovered now due to China’s stubborn stance and the inaction of US and Indian governments.

*****

irwin zaetz (1)

1st Lt. Irwin Zaetz (Burlington, Vermont), navigator of the B-24 bomber “Hot as Hell”

For many years (at least since 2004), the US Government has known, and has stated publicly, that the mortal remains of over 400 US airmen still lie unrecovered at their World War II crash sites in northeast India, primarily in Arunachal Pradesh.   These aircraft crashed while flying back and forth between Assam and South China, in support of the Chinese war effort against Japan. In the years immediately after the war, the US military made efforts to locate these crash sites, so as to recover and repatriate  these airmen’s mortal remains to the US for proper burial, but failed.

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